Guitar: I want to tune the 6th string from standard e to low Bb tuning

Discussion in 'Pro Audio' started by bluesjeon, Dec 27, 2004.

  1. bluesjeon

    bluesjeon Guest

    I want to tune the 6th string from standard E to low Bb tuning in
    6string guitar
    therefore, the pickup which i have to buy must pick up from e to low
    Bb frequency(maybe 40~80hz,isn't it?)
    what pickup or guitar or something is fit to me?
    and the pickup or guitar have good sound and no problem?


    as far as i am concerned, a new pickup (which have low cut switch
    selector(according to the low down tuning) might be made in the
    future...
     
    bluesjeon, Dec 27, 2004
    #1
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  2. bluesjeon

    agent86 Guest


    Whatever pickup you already have will be fine.
     
    agent86, Dec 27, 2004
    #2
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  3. bluesjeon

    hank alrich Guest

    Have you tried that yet? You'll find that:

    1. You'll need a really fat string to offer something other than mush to
    your fingers, not to mention avoiding significant string-to-fret rattle.
    I use a .056 on the bottom of my electric, and that's nowhere near fat
    enough for low Bb.

    2. That fat string will require that you alter the nut and maybe the
    saddle, too, to accomodate it, and readjust the action of the guitar.
    Any decent pickup will work.
     
    hank alrich, Dec 27, 2004
    #3
  4. bluesjeon

    playon Guest

    It ought to work OK if he uses a Fender-scale guitar and puts a
    heavier guage on the low E, like a .58 or so.

    Al
     
    playon, Dec 28, 2004
    #4
  5. bluesjeon

    RD Jones Guest

    If the rest of the guitar is tuned to standard 'E',
    then doesn't that make the Bb a 'flatted fifth' ?
    i.e. the 'evil' note (tri-tone)
    Just curious what style of music you might be playing,
    Black Sabbath, Goth Rock, etc. ?

    RD
     
    RD Jones, Dec 28, 2004
    #5
  6. bluesjeon

    DaveBro Guest

    Seems to me that if you're adding a low 7th string on a guitar, you'd
    want it tuned to B natural. That way it's consistent with the fourth
    intervals that make up (most of) guitar standard tuning. You may not
    have an immediate grasp of the *notes* on the new string, but the
    intervals will feel right.

    For example, the open 7th string will give you the 5th of an E chord
    (similar to how the open 6th string is the 5th of an A chord), and you
    can get an alternating bass on a G chord by moving between 6th
    string/3rd fret and 7th string/3rd fret.

    Dave
     
    DaveBro, Dec 28, 2004
    #6

  7. Your present pickup will cope fine. The guitar probably won't.
    Have you tried?

    CubaseFAQ www.laurencepayne.co.uk/CubaseFAQ.htm
    "Possibly the world's least impressive web site": George Perfect
     
    Laurence Payne, Dec 28, 2004
    #7
  8. bluesjeon

    Mike Rivers Guest

    I have an acoustic 12-string guitar that I have tuned down so that the
    E strings are B. I think I'm using a 0.069" string for the low string.
    It's a little floppy but matches the rest of the strings pretty well
    (which are pretty much medium-light standard gages moved over one
    string).

    --
    I'm really Mike Rivers ()
    However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
    lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
    you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
    and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
     
    Mike Rivers, Dec 28, 2004
    #8
  9. bluesjeon

    Mike Rivers Guest

    Most people who play "extra string" guitars are playing jazz, where
    they play in the flat keys pretty often. If you're playing in E-flat
    or B-flat, it's probably nice to have an open bass string you can use
    when you have your hand up the neck. I knew someone who had a harp
    guitar with about six "down there" strings that didn't even have a
    fretboard under them. He would tune them to be convenient bass notes
    for the key in which he was playing.

    --
    I'm really Mike Rivers ()
    However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
    lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
    you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
    and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
     
    Mike Rivers, Dec 28, 2004
    #9
  10. bluesjeon

    hank alrich Guest

    My Ibanez Musician has a .56 on the bottom; another couple thousandths
    wouldn't put enough meat on that string to get down to Bb usefully. Odds
    might be good that by the time the string is fat enough to offer
    sufficient physical resistance not to flop around, its
    thickness-to-chord length ratio will be suboptimal for useful tone
    generation.
     
    hank alrich, Dec 29, 2004
    #10
  11. bluesjeon

    Guest Guest

    And there are the kids out there today who are playing Korn, etc.. with no
    idea of what flats are (not all of them). I think I remember teaching
    someone a Korn song with the 7th string B tuned to Bb. (Bb, Eb, Ab, Db, Gb,
    Bb, Eb). I think some of the bands are tuning down to C now. Pretty soon
    we'll be taking the strings off of the guitar and banging the pickups for
    sound.....

    --litepipe
     
    Guest, Dec 29, 2004
    #11
  12. bluesjeon

    playon Guest

    Well, here in the home of grunge, guys were tuning their Les Pauls
    down to C, and they weren't using bass strings on them. It works if
    you set the guitar up right, and use a very light touch.

    Al
     
    playon, Dec 29, 2004
    #12
  13. bluesjeon

    db Guest

    Here's a whacked out tuning that is totally conventional.

    Place the hi E string on the low E string tune to the same hi E.
    Place the B string on the A string..tune to A
    Place the G string on the D string tune to D
    PLace the D string on the G srting tune to G
    PLace the A string on the B String tune to B
    Place the low E string on the Hi E tune to E

    It requires some minor filing on an acoustic bridge to get the strings
    to fit.
    It requires no new knowledge to play chords, the same finger stops
    exists, except
    now you have different inversions on chords. Pretty wild.
    Dean
     
    db, Dec 29, 2004
    #13
  14. I'd be concerned about the effect of such a changeover on the guitar over
    time. Such things will throw even a nice neck out and there goes the
    guitar.

    Much better to buy the right guitar. A 7 string isn't that expensive and it
    already goes to B.
     
    Roger W. Norman, Dec 29, 2004
    #14
  15. Which is great if you only have a bass and drums playing with you. It's a
    bare on a rock piano player! <g>
     
    Roger W. Norman, Dec 29, 2004
    #15
  16. Personally tuning down seems to blow the natural resonance of a guitar and
    while, if you're writing a song for that particular tuning it may work out,
    it's not really the best thing to do. Ever watch really nice meters on a
    detuned guitar track? They go all over the place at the wrong times with
    odd order harmonics that drive meters mad.

    But what do I know?
     
    Roger W. Norman, Dec 29, 2004
    #16
  17. bluesjeon

    playon Guest

    Yeah but that's normal for a 12-string guitar... a proper 12 string
    has a longer scale than a regular guitar (27") and even with a normal
    scale it is standard to tune a 12 string down to C or C# because of
    the increased string tension from the added 6 strings. A lot of
    people don't know this and that's why you see a lot of old 12 strings
    with warped necks & other problems.

    AL
     
    playon, Dec 29, 2004
    #17
  18. bluesjeon

    playon Guest

    I strongly disagree -- on acoustic guitars, many sound more resonant
    with lowered tunings. With electrics it doesn't really matter, it's
    whatever the amp can take.

    Remember that guitar scale lenght evolved from older instruments that
    used gut strings. Steel strings are more capable of holding different
    tensions.

    and
    Who cares about the meters... it's the music we are after.

    Al
     
    playon, Dec 29, 2004
    #18
  19. bluesjeon

    Mike Rivers Guest

    This particular guitar is just a little on the large-bodied side, so
    it can take the lower tuning just fine. Leadbelly played a fairly
    small bodied Stella 12 string, and I guess he just tuned it down to
    save the guitar and match his voice.


    --
    I'm really Mike Rivers ()
    However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
    lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
    you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
    and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
     
    Mike Rivers, Dec 30, 2004
    #19
  20. bluesjeon

    playon Guest

    His Stella 12 string had a long 27" scale and was meant to be tuned
    low, the scale lenght has much more to do with it than the size of the
    box.

    Al
     
    playon, Dec 30, 2004
    #20
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