Mastering in ProTools: Wave or Not To Wave?

Discussion in 'Pro Audio' started by ted hyland, Mar 4, 2008.

  1. ted hyland

    ted hyland Guest

    First off, let me apologize if this has been covered recently. I haven't
    been paying attention to the group and I've forgotten how to check the
    archives.

    Secondly, when I say mastering I mean taking stereo mixes from whatever
    sources, putting them together, adjusting eq, volume and whatever and
    making a finished CD ready for duplication or replication.

    I care more about what you are using, but if you want to spill a few
    secrets on some settings or procedures, that's OK too.

    Now, I'm in the box using ProTools and I've become attached to Waves, so
    I'm looking to see what other people are doing.
     
    ted hyland, Mar 4, 2008
    #1
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  2. ted hyland

    hyland Guest

    Sorry,
    I didn't mean to be confusing. I am talking about plug-ins. I'm trying
    to find other alternatives to the Waves line of plug-ins. It's easy to
    just tweak up a Q10, a C4 and a L1 and master some stereo mixes. What
    else are you using? I know all about rooms and construction and even for
    our big project we sent it to the city for mastering, but for in-house
    we still do a lot for other clients. I'm surprised by the luke warm
    response to this post. - -Hello, is anybody alive out there (Chris
    'Maddog" Russo) - - Thanks.
     
    hyland, Mar 8, 2008
    #2
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  3. ted hyland

    Scott Dorsey Guest

    The L2 is probably the most transparent limiter I have ever used, but
    it can also be the most aggressive and ugly limiter if you want to do
    something stupid with it.

    I have not heard any of the digital equalizers that I like as much as
    a good analogue parametric for non-surgical work, but the Oxford EQ
    isn't bad at all.

    If I had to do quick and dirty CD mastering on the cheap, I'd probably
    pick a Compellor (not very controllable but very clean), maybe a Speck
    or even an old Orban 622 equalizer, and the hardware L2 box for both
    converters and limiting. This is pretty sufficient except for salvage
    work, and the Waves stuff has some things in there that are very handy
    for salvage work, like a multiband compressor that you can use to fix
    drum tubbiness or sibliance.

    Note that the 622 and the Compellor do not necessarily track perfectly.
    The big advantage of the digital processing is that it tracks perfectly.
    But in the CD world this is much less of an issue than in the LP world,
    although small channel mismatches can reduce loudness a bit.
    --scott
     
    Scott Dorsey, Mar 8, 2008
    #3
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