mono wire into a stereo input

Discussion in 'Pro Audio' started by genericaudioperson, Dec 7, 2008.

  1. Hello,

    if you had to run a mono signal into a stereo input, is the best
    solution to y-cable the mono source and run identical feeds into the
    stereo left-right?

    i'm not sure what happens if you run a mono cable into a trs stereo
    input. maybe it makes the sound bad or only plays one channel or
    something.
     
    genericaudioperson, Dec 7, 2008
    #1
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  2. genericaudioperson

    Mike Rivers Guest

    Yes, unless what's behind that input has a means of dealing with a mono
    input.
    You get signal on (usually) the left channel and nothing on the right
    channel since the ring contact of the jack (usually the right channel
    input) will be connected to the sleeve of the TS (mono) plug.
     
    Mike Rivers, Dec 7, 2008
    #2
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  3. Thank you, Mr. Rivers.
     
    genericaudioperson, Dec 7, 2008
    #3
  4. genericaudioperson

    Scott Dorsey Guest

    I have never seen a "stereo input" on a TRS plug. The only time I have
    ever seen 1/4" TRS plugs used for stereo is with headphones.
    Rather than asking silly questions like this, why not look at some
    actual connectors?

    If you plug a TS plug into a TRS jack, you will see that the tip contacts
    the tip, and the ring and sleeve of the jack are both connected to the
    sleeve of the plug. (That is, the ring has just become shorted to ground.)

    On the other hand, if you plug a TRS plug into a TS jack, tip and sleeve
    contact normally, but the ring on the plug doesn't get connected up to
    anything and just floats.

    Knowing this information you can figure out everything you need to know
    about interconnecting the two no matter what is on them.
    --scott
     
    Scott Dorsey, Dec 7, 2008
    #4
  5. genericaudioperson

    RDOGuy Guest

    It's certainly very rare, Scott... but there are examples. I have a
    Ramsa console that uses 1/4" TRS jacks for stereo effects returns.
     
    RDOGuy, Dec 7, 2008
    #5
  6. genericaudioperson

    Mike Rivers Guest

    1/4" TRS plugs aren't often used for stereo input, but 1/8" TRS plugs
    for stereo input are almost universal on the current crop of pocket
    sized flash memory recorders. The one exception I can think of off hand
    is the Korg MR-1, which has one 1/8" TRS jack for balanced inputs on
    each channel. And just about all built-in computer sound cards that have
    a line input have it as a stereo configuration on a 1/8" TRS jack.
     
    Mike Rivers, Dec 7, 2008
    #6
  7. genericaudioperson

    Mike Rivers Guest

    Need I remind people that T, R, and S stand for the Tip, Ring, and
    Sleeve components of a three conductor plug. 1/4" is a dimension. They
    don't always go together. TinyTel are always TRS, but are smaller than
    1/4", and, like 1/4" TRS connectors are more commonly used for a
    balanced mono connection than for a stereo (and necessarily unbalanced)
    connection.
     
    Mike Rivers, Dec 7, 2008
    #7
  8. genericaudioperson

    Mike Rivers Guest

    Oh, c'mon. You know what he's talking about. Or have you never seen a
    consumer grade portable recorder newer than about 1970?
    Of course, but then you'd have to look it up. Suppose he said "The line
    input of a Zoom H2?"
     
    Mike Rivers, Dec 7, 2008
    #8
  9. genericaudioperson

    RD Jones Guest

    It's certainly very rare, Scott... but there are examples. I have a
    Ramsa console that uses 1/4" TRS jacks for stereo effects returns.

    RME uses 1/4" TRS stereo inputs on the Digi 96/8 PST and PAD cards.
    Rane has them as expander inputs (and outs) on the small rack mixer.

    rd
     
    RD Jones, Dec 8, 2008
    #9
  10. genericaudioperson

    RDOGuy Guest

    Oh, yeah... that reminds me! The Rane HC-6 has 1/4" TRS stereo ins
    and outs, too.
     
    RDOGuy, Dec 8, 2008
    #10
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