Monster RCA cables vs. regular RCA cables for analog devices

Discussion in 'Pro Audio' started by Leonid Makarovsky, Dec 15, 2005.

  1. I'm just wondering are Monster cables really that much better than the regular
    RCA cables for just regular analog devices such as tape deck going to a
    receiver or a CD player going to a receiver. Thanks.

    --Leonid
     
    Leonid Makarovsky, Dec 15, 2005
    #1
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  2. "Leonid Makarovsky" wrote ...
    NO

    You will rarely see a reference to that brand name without other
    common words like "botique", "snake-oil", "ripoff", "magic",
    "overpriced", "scam", etc.
     
    Richard Crowley, Dec 15, 2005
    #2
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  3. Nope. They're nicely made, but they don't carry a signal any better.
     
    Jim Gilliland, Dec 15, 2005
    #3

  4. What are you, new here?

    Are you really so bored that you have nothing better to do than troll?

    If you're gonna stir up shit, at least try to make it funny, wouldya?

    On the extremely slim chance that you're not kidding, *GOOGLE* baby!

    http://groups.google.ca/groups?&as_epq=monster+cable&as_ugroup=rec.audio.pro

    --
    "It CAN'T be too loud... some of the red lights aren't even on yet!"
    - Lorin David Schultz
    in the control room
    making even bad news sound good

    (Remove spamblock to reply)
     
    Lorin David Schultz, Dec 15, 2005
    #4
  5. : On the extremely slim chance that you're not kidding, *GOOGLE* baby!

    No, I wasn't. I didn't mean necessarily monster as brand name, but I meant
    those thick RCA cables which are similar to Monster ones. So my
    question is rather - old style regular RCA cables (L/R) vs Monster or similar
    thick fancy cables. Is it waste of $$$$?

    All I know that the old style thin cable can't be use to pass the digital audio
    out for instance (I did try it).

    I need a lot of them and I don't want to waste $$$ where it's not worth it.

    : http://groups.google.ca/groups?&as_epq=monster+cable&as_ugroup=rec.audio.pro

    Thanks. I'll check it out.

    --Leonid
     
    Leonid Makarovsky, Dec 15, 2005
    #5
  6. Leonid Makarovsky

    Mike Rivers Guest

    Yes, much better . . . for the Monster shareholders. For that
    application, any cable that passes electricity will work fine. This
    doesn't sound like either a mission critical application or something
    that you're likely to be disconnecting and re-connecting a few times a
    week (in which case you shouldn't be using RCA connectors anyway), so
    there's no need to get a really beautifully constructed cable.

    Remember, you can buiy three or for Hosa or even Radio Shack cables for
    the price of a Monster cable, so even if it fails in ten years, you can
    replace it cheaply.
     
    Mike Rivers, Dec 15, 2005
    #6
  7. Leonid Makarovsky

    DC Guest


    As long as you plug them in going the right direction. There are arrows,
    you know.
     
    DC, Dec 15, 2005
    #7
  8. Leonid Makarovsky

    Mike Rivers Guest

    I've used ordinary audio cables to pass S/PDIF digital audio. You can't
    use a very long cable, but just about any pre-made RCA cable has done
    OK for me up to about 6 feet. And for not much money, you can buy real
    75 ohm cable with RCA connectors on both ends under the guise of "video
    cable" which is the right stuff for S/PDIF.
     
    Mike Rivers, Dec 15, 2005
    #8
  9. : http://groups.google.ca/groups?&as_epq=monster+cable&as_ugroup=rec.audio.pro

    Thanks for the link. I had no idea about this Monster crap. Now, I'll be
    avoiding this brand name. It's just recently I upgraded my system so I needed
    to buy new cables. All salesmen were trying to convince me to buy Monster
    brand. I suspected it was rather hype, so I decided to ask here. I had no idea
    it was rather a sensitive subject.

    --Leonid
     
    Leonid Makarovsky, Dec 15, 2005
    #9
  10. : OK for me up to about 6 feet. And for not much money, you can buy real
    : 75 ohm cable with RCA connectors on both ends under the guise of "video
    : cable" which is the right stuff for S/PDIF.

    Thanks. By the way, going from 7.1 or 5.1 receiver to sub-woofer's built-in
    amp - the signal is analog - not digital, right?

    --Leonid
     
    Leonid Makarovsky, Dec 15, 2005
    #10
  11. Leonid Makarovsky

    Mike Rivers Guest

    Usually. But you were the one who mentioned digital.
     
    Mike Rivers, Dec 15, 2005
    #11
  12. Leonid Makarovsky

    Scott Dorsey Guest

    No, for the most part, Monster cables are more poorly made than typical
    mid-grade pro audio cables like Gotham or Whirlwind assemblies. The
    problem is that they are far more profitable for retailers to carry, so
    unfortunately at the typical MI store or stereo place, you see really
    crappy cables and overpriced Monster cables and nothing else. They have
    really driven everyone else out of the MI and home market with good
    marketing and dealer incentives.
    --scott
     
    Scott Dorsey, Dec 15, 2005
    #12
  13. Leonid Makarovsky

    Scott Dorsey Guest

    IF you need to carry S-PDIF digital audio, or you need to carry video, then
    you need a 75 ohm coaxial cable. It doesn't matter who makes it as long
    as it has a real 75 ohm characteristic impedance. Buy the cheap Gepco
    foamcore ones.

    These are usually not very good choices for analogue audio, though. Different
    materials for different jobs.
    To do what?
    --scott
     
    Scott Dorsey, Dec 15, 2005
    #13
  14. Leonid Makarovsky

    RD Jones Guest

    from answers.com:
    mon·ster (mÅn'stÉ™r)
    n.
    1. a, An imaginary or legendary creature, such as a centaur or Harpy,
    that combines parts from various animal or human forms. b, A creature
    having a strange or frightening appearance.
    2. An animal, a plant, or other organism having structural defects or
    deformities.
    3. Pathology. A fetus or an infant that is grotesquely abnormal and
    usually not viable.
    4. A very large animal, plant, or object.
    5. One who inspires horror or disgust: a monster of selfishness.
    adj. Informal.
    Extremely large; monstrous

    Most modern equipment with a low source impedance going
    short distances will not be effected by moderate amounts of
    cable capacitance. It's only when going long distances from
    high impedance sources does cable capacitance become an
    issue that produces audible signal degradation.
    There's no gaurantee that a fatter cable will have a lower capacitance.
    Does the Monster cable have pF/foot rating ?
    A heavier cable _might_ be more durable but for the typical
    fixed installation this is a minor consideration.
    Good quality cable TV coax (RG59,etc) is not expensive.

    rd
     
    RD Jones, Dec 16, 2005
    #14
  15. Leonid Makarovsky

    Scott Dorsey Guest

    Also not appropriate for audio or baseband video use because of the aluminum
    shield design; you can't solder to the stuff. This means you can't attach
    solder-type BNC or RCA connectors.

    Note that there are a lot of different cable designs all called RG59,
    all with different shields, center conductors, and dielectric. They
    only share dimensions and characteristic impedance, because that is
    all the Radio Guide specified for that cable.

    The stuff the cable TV guys use is really godawful. Spend an extra
    penny or two a foot and get copper braid shields.
    --scott
     
    Scott Dorsey, Dec 16, 2005
    #15
  16. My experience of Monster brand cables in consumer electronics
    is less than neutral. My day job troubleshooting folks'
    home installations has shown me quite a few examples of
    Monster brand cables physically destroying the jacks into
    which they were plugged, upon unplugging, by literally
    dragging the shield conductor out with them.

    Although it makes zero difference in sound from an
    ordinary cheap wire, if you really want a pretty factory-
    made wire, the Tributaries brand is rugged and reliable.

    Moving upscale from factory-made wires is custom made
    lengths of RG59, terminated with appropriate connectors.
    Properly dressed and laced, this can be very attractive
    and professional looking. You can do this yourself with
    only a little practice, but it requires some tools for
    proper terminations.

    Good fortune,

    Chris Hornbeck
     
    Chris Hornbeck, Dec 16, 2005
    #16
  17. Cable TV stuff these days is very specialized; quad-shield
    RG6 with, as you say, all aluminium shields. This can be
    terminated to RCA connectors, but the OP would need the
    proper ends and the appropriate compression tools.

    At my day gig, we buy RG59 with solid center conductor
    and aluminium braid/ foil pair and terminate to RCA with
    matching ends and compression tools. Works great, but
    you'd be dead in the water without the exact matching
    stuff.

    Personally, I'd rather solder everything, but that's just me.
    For my crews, compression is safer and surer. Sad comment
    on the modern world, ain't it?

    Thanks, as always,

    Chris Hornbeck
     
    Chris Hornbeck, Dec 16, 2005
    #17
  18. I'd debate the "nicely made" part of this thread somewhat. I got a set of
    Monster interconnects one time that had not been assembled correctly.....NO
    solder on the center pin connections on either end. Sent some high-res
    ..jpg's to Monster, got the cables replaced and a t-shirt to boot. Still lost
    some project time on that one.

    dave
     
    Dave Morrison, Dec 16, 2005
    #18


  19. It's not just Monster. Snake Oil cable companies are everywhere. It's
    an industry.

    Buy cables that look well made, so that they'll be reliable. Any other
    characteristic is going to be irrelevant at typical home theatre system
    lengths. Is your system "typical?" Do you have any really long runs?

    If a salesman starts telling you how great a certain cable is, ask him
    the capacitance per foot. You don't even need to know what it means,
    because I guarantee he won't!

    --
    "It CAN'T be too loud... some of the red lights aren't even on yet!"
    - Lorin David Schultz
    in the control room
    making even bad news sound good

    (Remove spamblock to reply)
     
    Lorin David Schultz, Dec 16, 2005
    #19
  20. Leonid Makarovsky

    EricK Guest

    Nicely made? Really? The XLR cables that I have seen from Monster look
    like training projects for soldering 101 students. Very Sloppy. Luckily
    a Monster Rep gave them to me for free. He thought he could could get me
    hooked on them. Not likely. I would not pay $100-200 dollars for that
    shit. No way!

    --
    Eric

    Practice Your Mixing Skills
    Download Our Multi-Track Masters
    www.Raw-Tracks.com
    www.Mad-Host.com
     
    EricK, Dec 16, 2005
    #20
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