speaker cabinet repair

Discussion in 'DIY Discussion' started by cab586, Apr 16, 2005.

  1. cab586

    cab586

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    anyone know how to make good scratches, spike dents and knicks on speakers? someone suggested walnut oil for the scratches but not sure how to deal with the other marks. thanks.
     
    cab586, Apr 16, 2005
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  2. cab586

    Anex Thermionic

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    An axe? ;)

    Are they veneered or real wood? And how are they finished?
     
    Anex, Apr 16, 2005
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  3. cab586

    cab586

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    wood.
     
    cab586, Apr 17, 2005
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  4. cab586

    Lord .

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    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 17, 2005
    Lord, Apr 17, 2005
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  5. cab586

    cab586

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    thanks lord. will start on an old table and then move on to the speakers.
     
    cab586, Apr 17, 2005
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  6. cab586

    Anex Thermionic

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    What type of wood though? If they are walnut then walnut oil would be great, it may cover more than you think- its obviously not going to work mirracles but it would atleast make dents blend in a bit and is easier than filling. If its a different type of wood I'd have thought getting something designed to treat that wood would be a better option.
     
    Anex, Apr 17, 2005
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  7. cab586

    cab586

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    mmm...did a bit of digging. speakers are real wood veneer (cherry).
     
    cab586, Apr 17, 2005
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  8. cab586

    Anex Thermionic

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    Have the dents gone through the veneer to the weetabix below? Veneer is harder to repair. Like Lord said, that wax filler is probably a good start.
     
    Anex, Apr 17, 2005
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  9. cab586

    cab586

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    one dent has gone through; the rest are quite shallow as are the scratches. i'll use the oil to repair the sratches and the filler to repair the dents.
     
    cab586, Apr 17, 2005
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  10. cab586

    Anex Thermionic

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    Might be worth having a look around for some cherry wood oil
     
    Anex, Apr 17, 2005
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  11. cab586

    Bob McC living the life of Riley

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    small dents in veneer can be raised by ironing over them with a damp towel. Some polish repair will then be needed but it isn't difficult.

    Bob
     
    Bob McC, Apr 17, 2005
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  12. cab586

    rsand I can't feel my toes

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    What about re veneering? A proper face lift by using a different wood (IME cherry is hard to work with but not impossible). Its easier than you think and you could even re-wire wile the drives are out?
    I veneered this rack in cherry to match my MA20's. Dont judge the rack too harshly its only temporary, its just 4 shelfs from my modular rack I made screwed together as it didn't fit my upgrade in its modular state.
    [​IMG]
     
    rsand, Apr 19, 2005
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  13. cab586

    cab586

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    rsand. where do i start?
     
    cab586, May 2, 2005
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  14. cab586

    rsand I can't feel my toes

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    You need to find a supplier of the veneer, bt.com search through business by type. Next you have to convince them to trade with you, its best to phone them and explain you want to pay cash and you know exactly what you want as they are not really interested in one guy covering some speakers so you need to convince them you will be in and out with little dissruption to their business. Not sure where you are but I bought mine from Leeds.
     
    rsand, May 3, 2005
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  15. cab586

    cab586

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    thanks!
     
    cab586, May 4, 2005
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  16. cab586

    rsand I can't feel my toes

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    Make sure you pick a veneer thats prety flat, the cherry in the pic was a bit wavey so was impossible to get flat without the presses that proper manufacturers use but tbh no one notices I'm just a perfectionist.
    Oak and birds eye maple are very flat and as a result very easy to work with, dont even think about burr walnut even though it looks amazing.

    I cut the veneer to oversize and glued it on using evostick which qives a perfect bond. Then trim the excess with a sharp craft knife, dont try and do it with one cut or it will tear. Patience is the key, let the glue dry properly and trim with 3-4 strokes each side.

    If your veneer isnt wide enough you will need to join it. The way I worked out was to get the 2 pieces together one on top of the other and slice through both to get a perfect edge to butt. Next butt them together on you new cut and hold them together with masking tape all the way along the join, it looks best if you mirror the grain rather than run it on. Glue the joined veneer as above befor removing the tape. No one has noticed the joins I have done!

    When all pieces are glued and dried (12-24hrs) use a fine sandpaper to bevel all the edges, this step transforms it from looking like you've just stuck it on and gives it the manufacturers look.

    Cutting around the speakers is the trickiest bit, so do it first because if you cock it up you wont damage the other sides removing it. Stick the veneer on as normal, covering the holes and using a sharp knife gently trim back to the cabinets holes. You can smooth it with sanding but the contrast of the speaker will disgise minor errors. You will need to pack each drive unit with the waste veneer otherwise the drives will not be flush with your new finish.

    Experiment with finishing, a bottle of french polish has instructions on and is surprisingly easy to do (high gloss finish) although a wax product is the easiest (satin finish) and looks great on lighter woods IMO. Practice finishes on scrap veneer stuck to MDF before attempting the speakers.

    I noticed an improvement in sound when I did this? Maybe the cabinets were damped a bit more or a bit more rigid? Might pay you to re wire whilst to have them appart.

    MAIN THING IS DON'T RUSH!!
     
    rsand, May 5, 2005
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  17. cab586

    rsand I can't feel my toes

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    After seeing the ebony finish on a pair of quads this weekend I would be tempted to try that with french polish they looked gorgeous!
     
    rsand, May 5, 2005
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